Response to hen harrier brood management proposals

Hen harriers are one of the rarest breeding birds in England. The Wildlife Trusts cannot support the recent decision by Natural England to licence what is called “brood management” of hen harriers.
Hen Harrier - Mark Hamblin

Mark Hamblin/2020VISION

The uplands of England taken as a whole could be much richer in wildlife than they currently are. The UK’s eroding peatlands, which can be fantastic landscapes for wildlife, are currently estimated to be releasing carbon at a rate equivalent to three major cities. Water is running off our uplands because the soils are damaged causing flooding downstream and discolouration of drinking water. The Wildlife Trusts work with everyone we can, whether water companies or farmers, to seek to restore habitats so that wildlife can thrive again, and carbon and water can be stored in upland soils as it should. In this context we cannot support any action that inhibits nature’s recovery in the uplands. Hen harriers are one of the rarest breeding birds in England. The Wildlife Trusts cannot support the recent decision by Natural England to licence what is called “brood management” of hen harriers.