The Wildlife Trusts say rights to peaceful protest must be upheld

The Wildlife Trusts say rights to peaceful protest must be upheld

Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill threatens people's ability to stand up for nature

The Wildlife Trusts are concerned that the measures introduced in the proposed Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill which is being debated in the House of Commons this week will curtail this right to peaceful protest and make it harder for citizens to have their voices heard by those in power.

For decades, The Wildlife Trusts have marched to protect our seas through the Marine and Coastal Act; we’ve stood outside Parliament side-by-side with a huge cross section of society to demand action on the climate emergency; and we’ve protested to prevent the destruction of thousands of precious sites for wildlife over the years.

Protest over development on ancient woodland, Smithy Wood, Sheffield Wildlife Trust

Protest over development on ancient woodland, Smithy Wood, Sheffield Wildlife Trust

Craig Bennett, chief executive of The Wildlife Trusts says:

“It is essential that people are able to hold Government to account and make their voices heard. This requires transparency of decision-making and the right to peaceful protest. The ability of people to unite in standing up for wildlife is now more important than ever in making sure that tackling the nature and climate emergencies is prioritised by Government.

“This is yet another assault to the democratic process at the same time that the government is considering weakening the Judicial Review process and pursuing a deregulation agenda.”

Right to protest is crucial for environmental campaigning

 

 

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