Go wild in your garden! Large or small, ledge or yard, your garden can be a mosaic in a wider network of natural havens linking urban green spaces with nature reserves and the countryside.

Together, our gardens are a vast living landscape.  With an estimated 16 million gardens in the UK, the way they are cared for can make a big difference to the natural world.

Our 'How to get started' factsheets  cover everything from creating a miniature meadow and creature features, to making birdboxes and butterfly gardening!

Hedgehogs, sparrows, song thrushes and stag beetles are all declining species in the UK, but if we manage our gardens to benefit wildlife, these creatures and many more will find refuge.  It’s not hard to be help.  Consider a whole host of wild ideas and features – or just pick one and then sit back, enjoy the view and see who visits! 

Why have a plain, ugly fence when a green, living boundary can bring the riches of flowers, scent, berries, rich autumn colours and wildlife?  Ever thought about which heavenly-scented plants provide night-time nectar for moths?  Or digging a pond? If you introduce a water feature, not for fish but for newts, dragonflies, pond skaters, you'll also be providing water for birds. Plant up the edges with the golden blooms of marsh marigolds and the lush spikes of purple loosestrife and you'll have nectar stations for insects and beauty to dwell on.

Be inspired by our 'How to get started' factsheets – they cover everything from creating a miniature meadow and creature features, to making birdboxes and butterfly gardening...

Individual Wildlife Trusts around the UK have some expert wildlife gardening advice, community projects, gardens to visit and events.  Whether you want to apply for a wildlife gardening award scheme, take part in the pioneering Nature Street in Sussex, or donate to help buy Darwin’s childhood home in Shropshire, look no further!

Wildlife gardening books - we recommend!

Wildlife Gardening for Everyone: your questions answered, by the RHS and the Wildlife Trust has great advice from the experts.

The Wildlife Gardener: Creating a Haven for Birds, Bees and Butterflies by Kate Bradbury is useful, practical and very beautiful!

Online wildlife gardening resources

In addition to The Wildlife Trusts' How to get started factsheets, we work in partnership with the Royal Horticultural Society on a number of wildlife gardening projects:

  • Wild About Gardens - a joint TWT/RHS website packed full of information on wildlife gardening tips and projects and garden wildlife.
  • Gardening With Wildlife In Mind database - an online database of thousands of plants and animals which aims to help gardeners choose plants that attract wildlife.