• Lower Plants and Fungi

  • It consists of 10 x 2-hour sessions on Tuesday evenings from 10th Jan (6.30 until 8.30 pm). The aim is to be able to produce a useful report such as a description of a nature reserve or a consultancy survey of a site. It is suitable for anyone with a little knowledge of botany through to professionals who want to be able to do more with their work. The tutor is Alex Lockton, who has twenty years’ experience working as a lecturer in ecology at Birmingham University and Manchester Metropolitan University, as co-ordinator of the Botanical Society of the British Isles, and as an ecological consultant. He is county recorder for Shropshire and author of The Flora and Vegetation of Shropshire (2015). Each class will start with a short session identifying a plant, and then continue on to a theoretical subject. The winter course will focus on theory and scholarship, and be followed by a summer course on surveying.

  • Join the Friends of Castle Meadows for a guided walk with expert Fiona Ford and learn about myths and stories connected with the plants found there.

  • A study day for all experience levels to learn what a camera trap is and how to make the most of it. Practical demonstration and a chance to practise yourself with camera traps provided. Some classroom studies and practical demonstration.

  • We will explore ways we can manage our gardens to reduce incidences of what we consider to be pests and disease without continually reaching for the chemical sprays. (Course fee is £16 for a half-day session)

  • Plants that live on coastal mudflats are highly specialised to cope with grim conditions –they are not only a beautiful addition to the scene but have some fascinating stories to tell. They deserve knowing better.

  • An introduction to these rapidly declining, frequently overlooked but often beautiful plants, focussing on the rarer species of the chalk. Suitable for beginners and intermediates.

  • Find out about barn owl ecology and habitat management. Includes practical sessions such as trapping small mammals, studying barn owl pellets, and visiting a barn owl nesting box

  • Traditional flower-rich meadows are fast disappearing from our landscape. Yet they support wonderful wildflowers and grasses as well as bumblebees, butterflies and other wildlife that depends on them. Our meadows need managing and this study day discusses how to recognise and survey meadows and the principles and practicalities of meadow management.

  • Lower Plants and Fungi