Derby's peregrine falcon eggs start to hatch

Monday 9th May 2011

Derby's world-famous peregrine falcons hatched their first chick of the season this morning.

The birds, which have been nesting on the side of Derby Cathedral's tower since 2006 had four eggs. One was seen to have hatched out around 2am this morning (Monday 9th), and others are expected to hatch very soon.

Derby's peregrines now bring many visitors to the city and to the Cathedral

Although today was the predicted hatching day, the Peregrine Project Team were alerted to the news by comments left by webcam watchers on their blog in the middle of the night. "It's great that so many people watch the webcams right around the clock from all parts of the globe," said Nick Moyes, one of the project team who installed the webcameras and nesting platform. "We don't expect every egg to hatch out, nor do we expect all the chicks to survive to adulthood. But nesting here in Derby gives them the very best chance of survival, and it gives others the very best opportunity to watch them."

Derby's peregrines now bring many visitors to the city and to the Cathedral. Visitors to the Derby Cathedral Coffee House which is just opposite the cathedral entrance can now watch the birds via a large monitor kindly provide by nearby Square. Online, the webcams and blog can be found at www.derby.gov.uk/peregrines.

The Peregrine Project has recently been bolstered by news that Derby Cathedral Quarter is to become a partner in supporting and promoting the work of the project team.

"This is great news for the project," said Jane Proctor, Marketing and Resource Development Manager of Derbyshire Wildlife Trust. "It's important that we secure the funding to maintain and improve what the project does in Derby, and having the Cathedral Quarter on board is really exciting for everyone. It really reflects the importance that these peregrine falcons are having on people's perceptions of the city, and it's great that Derby is benefiting from genuine eco-tourism."

 

Story by Derbyshire Wildlife Trust
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Image credit: Neil Aldridge