'Ocean frontiers' film screening

Thursday 20th March 2014

Corkwing wrasse cpt Paul Naylor www.marinephoto.co.uk

Plymouth University is introducing the film, 'Ocean Frontiers', at a special screening on Tuesday 25 March 2014. A panel discussion, featuring people involved in UK marine conservation efforts, and reception will follow.

Many people see the sea simply as a huge expanse of water, but under the surface lie habitats every bit as varied as those on land – here in the UK our seas are home to kelp forests, seagrass meadows, mud plains, rocky reefs, deep-water corals and more

Ocean enthusiasts, educators, scientists, and residents are invited to attend this screening of the award-winning Green Fire Productions film, “Ocean Frontiers: The Dawn of a New Era in Ocean Stewardship.”

This inspiring film takes you on a voyage from coasts to watersheds across America to ask, “How do we meet our ever-expanding demands on the ocean and work together to protect it?”  It shares stories of successful partnerships based upon cooperation between community and scientific stakeholders that are both insightful and moving. 

The film examines the busy shipping lanes of Boston Harbour, the fishing community of Port Orford, Oregon, the Florida Keys, and finally the US’s premier seafood nursery in the Mississippi Delta.  Here an intermingling of unlikely allies, of industrial shippers, whale biologists, pig farmers and wetland ecologists, to sport fishers and reef snorkelers and many more, all of them embarking on a new course of cooperation, to sustain the sea and our ocean economies.

But this drive for better protection and management of the sea is not something which is unique to America.  We have seen huge changes to the way we manage our seas here in the UK.

Director of Plymouth University’s Centre for Coastal and Marine Research, Dr Stephen Fletcher stated,

“We are excited to bring Ocean Frontiers to Britain’s Ocean City. This film conveys that win-win solutions are possible when industry, scientists, fishermen, conservationists, and government work together.  We have much to be proud of in the UK, and here in the south west.  Working in partnership both within and across sectors is essential to improve management of our seas”.

Dr Lissa Batey, Living Seas Officer for The Wildlife Trusts, said:

“Many people see the sea simply as a huge expanse of water, but under the surface lie habitats every bit as varied as those on land – here in the UK our seas are home to kelp forests, seagrass meadows, mud plains, rocky reefs, deep-water corals and more.  These richly varied habitats support thousands of plants and animals, from sea horses to basking sharks.  We need to protect this richly varied natural resource.  As well as being a source of wonder, it is also a playground, a food supply, a conduit for our imports and exports and a climate regulator that absorbs vast quantities of greenhouse gases while releasing oxygen we can breathe.  We are an island nation and the sea is a vital part of our national identity.”

Doors open at 6.45pm. “Ocean Frontiers” screens at 7pm. After the award-winning 60-minute film, there will be a panel discussion featuring Dr Lissa Batey, Living Seas Officer for The Wildlife Trusts, followed by a short reception.

This event is sponsored by Green Fire Productions and the Centre for Marine and Coastal Policy Research (MarCoPol), with support from The Wildlife Trusts.

Event Details:

WHEN: March 25, 2014, 6:45pm – 8:30pm 

WHERE: Jill Craigie Cinema, Roland Levinsky Building, Plymouth University

WHO: Open to the general public (spaces limited, first-served).

Booking: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/MarCoPol

Film trailer: www.ocean-frontiers.org

Social Media: www.facebook.com/OceanFrontiers, Twitter @Ocean_Frontiers @MarCoPolPU @wildlifetrusts

Contact:

Dr Wendy Dodds
Wendy.dodds@plymouth.ac.uk
01752 586171
07973190553

Editors’ Notes:

1. The Centre for Marine and Coastal Policy Research (MarCoPol) at Plymouth University brings together academics from the fields of policy, sociology, economics, law, business and ecology, making it a truly interdisciplinary research centre.  It aims to provide a sound scientific, social, legal and economic basis for improved policy and management for the sustainable use and protection of the marine and coastal environment.  http://www1.plymouth.ac.uk/research/marcopol/Pages/default.aspx

2. The Wildlife Trusts www.wildlifetrusts.org

There are 47 individual Wildlife Trusts covering the whole of the UK. All are working for an environment rich in wildlife for everyone. We have more than 800,000 members including 150,000 members of our junior branch Wildlife Watch. Our vision is to create A Living Landscape and secure Living Seas. We run marine conservation projects around the UK, collecting vital data on the state of our seas and celebrating our amazing marine wildlife.

The Wildlife Trusts are urging coast-lovers to do more than dip a toe in the water this summer as they invite the nation to plunge into the possibilities of exploring the UK’s undersea world. Our Marine Wildlife: National Marine Week runs for more than two weeks from 26 Jul - 10 Aug offering endless opportunities to day-trippers and holidaymakers who want to savour our shores and discover what lies beneath the waves.

We manage around 2,300 nature reserves and every year we advise thousands of landowners and organisations on how to manage their land for wildlife. Every year we work with thousands of schools and our nature reserves and visitor centres receive millions of visitors. Each Wildlife Trust is working within its local communities to inspire people about the future of their area: their own Living Landscapes and Living Seas. 

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Tagged with: Living Seas